IP Camera
Home IP Cameras Reviews Forums IP Camera Software IP Camera Comparison Tools and Support Contact Us

Site Search

Your IP Network Camera and Video Server Source


- IP Camera and Video Server Reviews
- Discussion Forums
- Tools and Support
- Industry News and Articles
- Complete Product and Software Listings
Where to Buy

Latest IP Camera Reviews

Newsletter Sign Up

IP Camera Help Center

Information:
IP Camera Forum
Manufacturers
IP Camera Software
Integrators & Solution Providers
Glossary of Terms
Camera Comparison
Camera Demos
View Articles
Press Releases
Tools and Support
Where to Buy

Other Resources:

Website Help

About Us
Media Kit
Contact Us
RSS Feed
Site Map
Industry Links
Link Directory





 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

How many camera per Storage server in XPC


 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    IP Camera Forum Forum Index -> Milestone XProtect Software
Author Message
dhelio
New Member


Joined: 19 Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:10 am    Post subject: How many camera per Storage server in XPC Reply with quote

Hi,

I'm new in this software and currently having new project to design for Hotel CCTV system, the hotel requirement fits the Milestone XProtect Corporate setup.

The problem I have is "how many camera per storage server I need to allocate" the whole design have around 850 IP cameras and minimum requirement is 4CIF at 25FPS for 30 days recording, There are also 3 security room on the design. I have read the XPC manual and it only indicates a hardware limitation for storage, so I supposed I need to take care the bandwidth and storage capacity only? Anyone can help me advice better knowledge on setting up the the system?

Just an overview on my design:
Security Room 1 ~ 350 IP Cameras
- 1 SQL Server
- 1 Management Server
- 6 Storage Server
- 1 FailOver Server
- Necessary Client PC

Security Room 2 ~ 350 IP Cameras
- 1 SQL Redundant Server
- 1 Management Redundant Server
- 6 Storage Server
- 1 FailOver Server
- Necessary Client PC

Security Room 3 ~ 150 IP Cameras
- 3 Storage Server
- 1 FailOver Server
- Necessary Client PC

I'm also trying to source out H.264 camera to save more on storage.
Any suggestion and/or comment is appreciated, thanks...javascript:emoticon('Very Happy')
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Josh
Expert


Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 132
Location: Beaverton, OR

PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi dhelio,

I highly recommend sending a message off to support@milestonesys.com where our support team can work with you to provide an all-around system spec. An 850 camera Corporate installation is no small project!

As far as speccing the storage goes, there are two things you need to be concerned about...

1. Storage space
2. Performance

In both cases you're going to need to estimate the amount of bandwidth you will be pulling from your cameras. You can do this by hand if you're comfortable with megabit/byte and kilobit/byte conversion, otherwise there are calculators on the Milestone web, and free online tools available through a quick google search.

Estimating storage space is pretty self-explanetory. Find out how much bandwidth you'll be using all together and convert it to GB/day times the number of days you want to retain. That'll tell you how much disk space you will use if you record everything. Then you need to estimate the amount of motion if you intend to record only on motion. Maybe the cameras are recording 70% of the time on average? Maybe 50%? This part is not a very accurate science unfortunately. It is a good idea to have a 20%-50% overhead on diskspace (and performace) to accomodate for errors in calculation and also for busy weeks. Sometimes there is a lot more motion than usual, like during a conference or gathering of some sort.

The performance side is the one most commonly misjudged. A single 3.5" rotational hard drive typically has about 6MB/s (megabytes per second) of random read/write bandwidth. You may read that the drive is capable 3Gbps, but this is just lies from the marketing department. If it says 3Gbps, they are talking about the bus speed of SATA II, not the actual read/write speed of the drive. The best random R/W I have witnessed from rotational media is about 10 MBps (80mbps) and that was with a 15k RPM SAS disk.

Oh, and 2.5" drives have roughly half the performance of 3.5" drives. They have to sacrifice the number of platters in order to get the small form factor and the fewer platters, the less performance.

So, if you use 6MBps as your guideline, or 48Mbps, and you know how much bandwidth you will pull from your cameras in total, then you can divide the total bandwidth in megabits per second by 48 which is the estimated random read/write speed of a single 7200 RPM SATA disk and this will tell you how many physical drives you would need at a MINIMUM. You would need to double that number if you intend to setup a RAID10. If you use a RAID5 it is much more difficult to accurately judge how many disks are necessary, but my guess is it would be about 30% fewer drives than if you were to setup a RAID10.

So let's say, for example, you are pulling down 600 megabits per second from your cameras, and recording on motion with 50% motion. You are recording to a local drive and archiving to a SAN once per day.

Your recording drive needs to support 600Mbps (incoming video) plus 300Mbps (video being archived while new video is recorded), plus the bandwidth generated by clients who might be viewing video recorded during the current day. At a minimum the recording drive must support 900Mbps not including clients who might be reviewing recently recorded footage (viewing live footage does not impact the storage performance of the recording server).

Your archiving drive must support 300Mbps of random R/W throughput in order for the archiving process to complete within 24 hours. You should also account for clients viewing recorded video, so find out how many clients there might be connected simultaneously, and how many cameras they might be viewing at once in browse mode. Add that bandwidth to the 300Mbps, and it would be a good idea to factor an additional 15% overhead on top of that at a bare minimum. Be aware that if the RAID must rebuild (and eventually it will!) the performance of that drive will decrease considerbly which will result in an overflow of temporary archives on your live recording drive. If you factor this in now, you will have a robust storage system that will not cause problems for you in the future.

So at a minimum the recording drive in this example would need to handle 900mbps + 15%, so 1035mbps. 1035 / 48 = 22, so a RAID0 with 22 drives would handle the amount of throughput required. If redundancy were required on the recording drive then you'd be looking ad 44 drives. Wow!

The archive drive needs to handle 300mbps * 1.15 = 345mbps and would require at least 8 drives.

This is a pretty extreme example, but hopefully you get the general idea. Make sure to contact support and get a pre-sales engineer involved. You will run into fewer surprises if you coordinate with a sales engineer on the design.
_________________
Support Engineer
Milestone Systems Inc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dhelio
New Member


Joined: 19 Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Josh,

Thank you very much, this a big help on further understanding the setup. I really have also this impression the 3Gbps is the actual R/W the drive can support as disk manufacturer specifies.

Anyway the installation for this project is by early next year but are already asked for design so cables and hardware installation can already be factor out on the site.

I will send out help/support from Milestone..

By the way, do I need to pay extra for redundancy servers?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Josh
Expert


Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 132
Location: Beaverton, OR

PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, you really have to read between the lines when looking at marketing material. The only drives that will ever approach 3Gbps random transfer speeds are solid state. I can't imagine rotational media will get much faster.

There is no additional cost for additional Recording Servers or Fail Over servers in Corporate. There is currently no way to have a failover management server, but you can accomplish this using VMware software pretty well. Again our sales engineers can be of help here with ideas to meet the customers needs.
_________________
Support Engineer
Milestone Systems Inc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    IP Camera Forum Forum Index -> Milestone XProtect Software All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 


Highest Rated
Warning: join() [function.join]: Invalid arguments passed in /home/ncrftp503/public_html/lib/functions.php on line 363
No cameras with more than 1 rating found

Most Viewed